Hieronder is het programma van het symposium weergegeven. De dag wordt gevuld met drie lezingen en twee workshops die paralel lopen. Bekijk hieronder voor de onderwerpen van deze lezingen (Nog onbekend). De lezingen worden in de ochtend gehouden in het Linneus en in de middag in het Huygensgebouw.

Tijd Activiteit Locatie
09.00 - 09.30 Ontvangst Centrale hal
09.30 - 09.45 Welkomstwoord door Steffen Sagave LIN 6
09.45 - 10.45 Laura Scarabosio LIN 6
10.45 - 11.00 Pauze
11.00 - 12.00 Vanja Nikolić LIN 6
12.00 - 13.00 Lunch Zuidstraat
13.00 - 14.00 Riccardo Cristoferi HG00.303
Laura Scarabosio HG00.310
Vanja Nikolić HG00.058
14.00 - 14.15 Pauze
14.15 - 15.15 Victoria Hoskins HG00.303
15.15 - 15.20 Dankwoord door Steffen Sagave HG00.303
Vanaf 15.20 Borrel Zuidstraat
 
 

De lezingen

Voorwoord door Steffen Sagave
About the host

Steffen Sagave obtained his PhD from the University of Bonn in 2006. After spending time as a postdoc or as a visiting professor at the universities of Oslo, Münster, Bonn and Wuppertal, he joined Radboud University as an assistant professor in 2015. His primary area of research is algebraic topology, or more specifically homotopy theory.



Lecture by Laura Scarabosio
About the speaker

Laura Scarabosio is assistant professor at the Radboud University since 2020. She obtained the PhD in Mathematics from ETH Zürich in 2016 under the supervision of Ralf Hiptmair and co-supervision of Christoph Schwab. She spent four years as postdoctoral researcher at TU Münich, when she conducted also research visits at the Oden Institute at UT Austin. Her research interests cover shape uncertainty quantification, Bayesian inverse problems, uncertainty quantification for random multiscale materials and applications to biology and medicine.

About the lecture (EN)

This talk is an introduction to the fascinating world of uncertainty quantification, a recent field which combines elements of numerical analysis and statistics. We will see what it means to quantify the uncertainty and why this is important in many applications. The forward and inverse problem will be described. We will then take a look at Monte Carlo methods and see how they can be used to compute pi.

Workshop: The hidden power of toilet paper (EN)

Who would have thought that the most powerful CPU in the world looks as simple as a toilet paper roll? Join the workshop and have fun in learning how to design algorithms with pen and paper...roll. You'll never look at a toiler paper roll in the same way ever again!

Lecture by Vanja Nikolić
About the speaker

Vanja Nikolić obtained her PhD at the University of Klagenfurt, Austria, in 2015. Between 2015 and 2019, she was a PostDoctoral researcher at TU Munich, Germany. Since November 2019, she has worked as an Assistant Professor in the Applied Mathematics Group at Radboud. Her research focuses on nonlinear partial differential equations with applications in ultrasonics.

Mathematics in waves (EN)

Abstract: In this talk, we will see what sound and water waves have in common and how applied mathematics can help us understand different wave phenomena around us.

Workshop: The hidden power of toilet paper (EN)

Who would have thought that the most powerful CPU in the world looks as simple as a toilet paper roll? Join the workshop and have fun in learning how to design algorithms with pen and paper...roll. You'll never look at a toiler paper roll in the same way ever again!

Workshop by Riccardo Cristoferi
About the speaker

Riccardo Cristoferi studied Mathematics both at the Bachelor and the Master at the University of Trento (Italy). He obtained his PhD from SISSA (International School for Advanced Studies) in Trieste (Italy) in Applied Mathematics in 2015. After that he had the possibility to be a postdoc at the Center for Nonlinear Analysis at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh (USA) for 3 years, and then he moved to Heriot-Watt University in Edinburgh (UK) for a 2-year postdoctoral position. He arrived at Radboud University in August 2020. His mathematical area of expertise is the Calculus of Variations, and he is teaching two Master Courses related to that: Optimal Transport, and Gamma Convergence.

Workshop: The hidden power of toilet paper (EN)

Who would have thought that the most powerful CPU in the world looks as simple as a toilet paper roll? Join the workshop and have fun in learning how to design algorithms with pen and paper...roll. You'll never look at a toiler paper roll in the same way ever again!

Lecture by Victoria Hoskins
About the speaker

Victoria Hoskins obtained her PhD from the University of Oxford in 2012. After several postdoctoral positions and research visits in Berlin, Hannover, Paris and Zürich, she became a Junior Professor at the Freie Universität Berlin in 2014. She joined Radboud University as an assistant professor in January 2020. Her primary area of research is algebraic geometry, and in particular moduli spaces.

A first look at moduli through quivers (EN)

Summary: Moduli spaces are geometric solutions to classification problems, which appear in different fields of geometry, representation theory and mathematical physics. One of the simplest and most fundamental examples comes from quivers, which are directed graphs, and their representations, which are vector spaces and linear maps indexed by the vertices and arrows of the quivers. After introducing quiver representations and explaining how they generalise classification problems in linear algebra, we will construct moduli spaces using quotients of group actions. At the end, I will give an overview of various surprising applications of quiver moduli spaces.